Tag Archives: Order of Battle

Thank You Wargaming Community!

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The five layers that make up a General Staff map.

The General Staff Army Editor makes it pretty easy to create four of the five layers of a map file (see above). The problem is the beautiful background image that the user sees on screen (the computer AI couldn’t care less about the visual map). I’ve been able to locate a lot of great maps; especially from the American Civil War and the US Library of Congress but we still need more.

Waterloo from Glenn Drover (Forbidden Games) and Jared Blando. Click to enlarge.

A couple of days ago I received an email from the famous game designer, Glenn Drover (Forbidden Games), who offered us the use of three maps that he had researched and were drawn by artist Jared Blando. Here’s a link to Forbidden Games’ site. Please check out their fantastic board games!

Ligny from Glenn Drover (Forbidden Games) and Jared Blando. Click to enlarge.

The three battlefield maps were Waterloo, Ligny and Quatre Bras.

Quatre Bras from Glenn Drover (Forbidden Games) and Jared Blando. Click to enlarge.

What is especially amazing is how well these three maps fit the style that I’ve wanted to create for General Staff.

In addition to these three great maps, which we will definitely be using for the battles of Waterloo, Ligny and Quatre Bras, I’ve received emails from a number of other wargamers who have offered to research OOBs; especially some in another language.

I am completely blown away (I know it’s a cliche, but I don’t have any other words) by the kindness and generosity shown me by the wargaming community. Thank you very much!

A Big Thank You to John McNamara!

Yes, I really do have a doctorate in computer science but often that just means I’m aware of how much I don’t know about computer programming. General Staff is being written in Microsoft WPF and sometimes it seems very arcane to me. I recently had a major problem with something very small; I just wanted to add a ‘thousands comma’ in the display of unit strengths. Well, because of a number of weird programming issues specific to WPF and the Victorian typography that we’re using, it took a couple of days to straighten it out and then only because John McNamara of Maine spent a great deal of his personal time to help me understand how Hierarchical Data Templates work in WPF. Here’s what the final results look like;

Sneak peak at the Scenario Editor Module. Just click and drag units from the Order of Battle Table on the left onto the map to place them for the beginning of the scenario. (Click to enlarge)

Again, thanks John! You’re the greatest! You want a free copy of General Staff when it ships?